Here's a collection of the most frequently asked questions concerning overclocking related problems we get.

- Will the different coolers fit in my case and on my motherboard?

- I'm getting the message "CPU is unworkable or has been changed." with every setting I try on my Abit motherboard. What's wrong?

- Why is my system becoming unstable when running at 75MHz and 83MHz FSB (Front Side Bus)? It's  not that much faster than the standard 66MHz, so what's wrong?

 

 

Will the different coolers fit in my case and on my motherboard?

That's a tough question to answer, since we don't know the dimensions of every motherboard and case on the market.
However, we can say that the CoolWhip™ Air series should be able to fit on any motherboard out there, since it's one of the most compact super-coolers available on the market. We have not come across a motherboard that couldn't house the CoolWhip™ Air coolers. Even when they are paired with TEC's they should be able to fit.
The CoolWhip™ Air is also one of the only Hi-performance coolers, that will fit in Slot 1/2/A Dual boards, since they usually have very little room for coolers, and again, your Dual board probably even have room for the TEC versions too.

When dealing with the CoolWhip™ Liquid series, it gets a little more difficult to give a direct answer. The 120/x series will probably need a roomy full-tower case with at least XXmm. of space above the power-supply. If you have a midi-tower or a "not-so-big" full-tower, you will probably have to go with the 80/x series. If you HAVE to have the best of the best cooling system, but your case can't house the 120mm cooler, you can use 2x80mm. coolers in series, for 2x the performance of one 80mm cooler.

 

 

I'm getting the message "CPU is unworkable or has been changed." with every setting I try on my Abit motherboard. What's wrong?

The problem is that Abit (by reasons unknown to us) has included an option in their Soft Menu called "Speed Error Hold". This option halts the system, if the speed is not set at default. This means that if you intent to overclock your CPU, you should disable this option. 
In short, set "Speed Error Hold" to "Disabled" and it should work.

 

 

Why is my system becoming unstable when running at 75MHz and 83MHz FSB (Front Side Bus)? It's  not that much faster than the standard 66MHz, so what's wrong?

The problem with some of the more odd FSB speeds, is that it forces your PCI cards and IDE channels to run above specifications. Although most PCI cards and harddrives usually have no problems running at those speeds, some do. What you can try, is lowering the PIO mode of you disks, and disabling Ultra DMA. This causes the harddrives to have higher CPU utilization, so it depends on what applications you are using. For games, the higher CPU speed usually gives better performance despite the slightly slower disc access, but if you are doing video editing or other things that needs CPU speed and harddisk access at the exact same time, it might be a disadvantage.

If the problem is related to a PCI card, there's not much you can do. You could replace the card with another (more tolerant preferably) card, but you'll never know beforehand how good a given card will respond to a high FSB speed.

Some of the never motherboards (Soyo's SY6-BA+III or SY6-BA+IV, MSI 6163 Pro...) gives the option of a 90 and 95 MHz FSB speed, that actually keeps the PCI cards and IDE channels below specifications. That way, you are only overclocking your CPU, and not the rest of your system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

More to come...